Global Chorus: Song for our Future

Great Bear National Rainforest, captured by Andrew S. Wright on our trip through the forest.

Great Bear National Rainforest, captured by Andrew S. Wright on our trip through the forest.

A couple years back I got a request to participate in writing something for a forthcoming book called Global Choruswhich is a collection of 365 voices on our future. The question posed was not a trivial one. Did I think that we—the human species—could find a way past the current global, environmental and social crises? Here are the words I shared:

Let me present

the proposition

if only for the sake

of dreaming:

What if this Earth of ours 

is a thing alive?

If this is so, 

then we have

a living, breathing organism 

that we continue to

extract,

partition,

fragment

in order to sell 

ourselves pretty promises

in perfectly produced packages,

compliments of our

unfulfilling quest to satiate

our conveyer belt consumerism. 

We are part of a unique,

integrative, living organism —

and as we discover more,

we uncover that there are no

“short cut” solutions to systemic issues.

We cannot day trade our way

through short term gains

and assume we’ll achieve

long-term sustainability.

Let us squarely face

the extent of the challenges

before us. 

Not just the ones we 

see on the surfaces 

of our screens, tablets, newspapers, devices.

It is not the obviousness

of markets and tsunamis,

poisoned sushi and celebrity babies.

It is the acceptance

that we will lose some of 

the world we love.

For it is then - 

and only then -

that we will gain

the insight

and the bravery to pursue

the solutions

that will remedy

some of the wrongs

we have collectively -

and sometimes unknowingly

pursued in the process.

 

Be aware however:

Even when these solutions

rise to the surface...

Even when the answers

lay so plainly before us - 

It is the personal, political

and market support

that will be needed

to move mass culture.

 

If eighty years of measuring

our world’s wealth remains

locked up in the three letter

acronym of “GDP”

and we remain tied to 

our financial revolver,

then let us consider:

Qualitative screening

on what we choose to invest in;

increased investment into businesses

that truly offer integrated solutions

(After all, does the world need another app?);

and integrated, systemic approaches

to sustainable development.

 

Realize this: 

The extent of our challenges 

are now far too vast 

for our silver bullets...

The target has grown,

but so has our understanding

and our appetite for

changing our world

in which we live,

For as history has shown,

it is the enduring

and incredible strength

of the human spirit

and ingenuity

that will engender 

to overcome,

to survive,

to thrive.

This man has saved 55% of the Colombian Amazon Rainforest and he's not stopping. Here's why.

This man has saved 55% of the Colombian Amazon Rainforest and he's not stopping. Here's why.

This man has saved 55% of the Colombian Amazon Rainforest and now wants to see an indigenously-owned corridor connected from the Andes to the Amazon. This is why you haven’t heard about it.

8 plants for those of us who have a “blackthumb.”

8 plants for those of us who have a “blackthumb.”

I’ve found growing plants in my home has inspired many of my friends to want to follow suit. Many admit that they would love to have plants in their house but they fear they have a black thumb. “I can’t even grown cacti,” one friend confessed. As you can imagine, the #1 question that I get asked is “What plants won’t I kill?”